SORRY! PLANNING PORTAL OUT OF ACTION: We are sorry to have to announce that The Bishopston Planning Portal is currently out of action. For technical reasons beyond our control, much of the information gathered via the portal is not currently being updated automatically, and therefore the portal does not currently provide a reliable indication of the details or status of planning applications. You may still view it, but beware of misleading results please. We are working to develop a fix for this problem. Bristol City Council's online planning database at https://planningonline.bristol.gov.uk/ remains the definitive source of information.

planningapplicationsApplication Summary
Address: 48 Egerton Road Bristol BS7 8HL
Proposal: Loft conversion including dormer extension and roof alteration

This application is the latest of a rash of boxy roof dormer developments which are increasingly blighting the Bishopston area and Egerton Road in particular. The proposal submitted is far from an architectural solution to the challenge of increasing the floor area of a 2 storey gabled period property. The large and extremely wide proposed dormer would be clearly visible from the street and even over the rooftop of no. 46 next door which is at a lower level.

20180319 123931


The main section of the proposed dormer, said to be allowed under Permitted Development, is unfortunate, ungainly and unsightly. However, the proposed further continuation of that dormer over the stairs and the bathroom below, to accommodate the en-suite, is unnecessary and unacceptable and should not be permitted. The detrimental impact which this application would have on the host property and neighbouring properties, not forgetting the street scene at large, is considerable. Simply planting a large faceless flat roofed box on the roof of an attractive and characterful period property is not an acceptable solution.

 

2018 03 19 4The preferred approach is clearly demonstrated at no. 23 Egerton Road, where the pitched roof was taken off and raised up just enough to achieve adequate room-in-the-roof headroom and then the roof tiles and the decorated fascia boards were reinstated, such that the end result looks as if it was originally built that way. If this approach was followed at no. 48, this would produce a long thin usable space, where the bedroom would be at the rear overlooking the garden and the en-suite at the front with a small square window set within the newly raised front gable. The headroom over the top of the stairs could be provided by means of a catslide side dormer locally, creating a characterful asymmetrical rear gable. The flat roof over the bathroom below should be left untouched.

We strongly recommend refusal of the current application as it stands.

 

We use cookies to improve our website and your experience when using it. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

  I accept cookies from this site.
EU Cookie Directive Module Information